John Ashley Fine Art Photography : Photo Keywords : flight  : <B>"Red-winged Blackbird."</B> Its takes two years before a male Red-winged Blackbird acquires its red and yellow shoulder epaulets. You can read more about Red-winged Blackbirds <a target="new" href="http://wildandfreemontana.blogspot.com/2011/03/red-winged-blackbirds.html">here</a> at my "<a target="new" href="http://wildandfreemontana.blogspot.com/">Wild & Free Montana</a>" website. <U><I>Behind the lens.</U> This is the quintessential marsh bird -- everyone knows, or should know, Red-winged Blackbirds. The females are a cryptic brown, but the males are unmistakable in their breeding plumage. I love photographs that show birds' wings at work. They allow you to stop and examine each feather, how it flexes and how it's used. But if you don't include some blur, then the bird looks motionless and out-of-sorts. So I was especially pleased at how this photograph turned out. Every feather has a function, the wingtips are in motion, and the focus is right where it should be -- on the eye.

Edit caption:


Save Cancel

Edit caption:


Save Cancel
All text and images © Copyright John Ashley. All rights reserved.